Why do some habits catch on faster than others?

  • In the era of the iPhone, Facebook, and Twitter, we’ve become enamored of ideas that spread as effortlessly as ether. We want frictionless, “turnkey” solutions to the major difficulties of the world—hunger, disease, poverty. We prefer instructional videos to teachers, drones to troops, incentives to institutions. People and institutions can feel messy and anachronistic. They introduce, as the engineers put it, uncontrolled variability.
  • Mass media can introduce a new idea to people. But, Rogers showed, people follow the lead of other people they know and trust when they decide whether to take it up. Every change requires effort, and the decision to make that effort is a social process.
  •  As the (sales) rep had recognized, human interaction is the key force in overcoming resistance and speeding change.
  • “Why did you listen to her?” I asked. “She had only a fraction of your experience.”
    All the nurse could think to say was “She was nice.”

SLOW IDEAS

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